RSS Feed

Tag Archives: food jags

Rosemary Garlic Oven Fries

After our trip to Great Country Farms earlier this month it has been potatoes, potatoes, potatoes on the menu.  One of the favorites for the Babe and AJ has been these oven “fries”.  This family is all about the oven fries.  They think they are getting away with eating junk for dinner.  I’ll admit, most of the time I cheat and buy the frozen version (LOVE the Alexia products).  But these fries are super easy to make and they are delicious.

Some potato fun facts:

Did you know that Americans get most of their vitamin C from potatoes?  Surprised?  Well we are a french fry nation.  One potato (5.3oz) has 45% of your daily value for vitamin C.

Potatoes are an excellent source of Potassium (620 mg in a 5.3 oz serving) to be exact.

They are fat-free.

Raw potatoes have the potential to last for months in storage.  Extend their life by storing them in a cool, dry place and do not wash them until you are ready to use them.

DSC_0085

Rosemary Garlic Oven Fries

Serves: 4  (2 Adults, 2 Kids)

4 to 10 potatoes**

2 Tbsp Olive Oil

1 Tbsp Fresh Rosemary, Chopped

3 Lg Garlic Cloves, Minced

1 Tsp Ground Black Pepper

1/2 Tsp Salt

Preheat Oven to 400 degrees.

Slice potatoes (into the fry shape) then toss with the olive oil, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper.  Spread into a single layer onto a cookie sheet and bake for about 30 minutes (longer if you like them really crispy, less if you prefer them very soft).

Share and enjoy!

    DSC_0099

**We are getting towards the end of our potato stash so I had to use these smaller ones.  Normally 4-5 large yukons or russets would have done the job.

***On a side note:  I was in no way compensated by Alexia Foods for this post.  Also, be patient with my food photography.  I just received a new camera for my birthday and am so excited to use it for the blog.

Advertisements

These Times, They Are a Changing

May and June have been a crazy couple of months for the McGrew family.  My husband, Tim graduated from the MBA program at William and Mary, AJ graduated from preschool, we have had tons of family visiting and most recently our family has relocated to Alexandria, VA.  It is just a few hours north of our happy home in Williamsburg, but it is like living in a totally different universe.  While my husband and I are excited about all of the great things our new city has to offer, the Babe and her brother are not quite as enthused.  We are trying our best to make a smooth transition as possible for them, getting the house together, visiting the new school, joining a pool, but it is still definitely challenging at times.  While AJ is really just moody, the Babe is trying her best to take control over every aspect of her world that she can.  Truthfully, I am not sure if it is the move or her setting a prime example of the terrible two’s.  Most likely it is a combination of both.  The most frustrating thing is that she has decided to demonstrate her power over her food.  As every parent knows, you cannot force your child to eat, and it appears that the Babe has figured that out too.  We all know how it goes, making progress (in any aspect of child development) and then BOOM!, back to square one.  She had been doing so well, sharing meals with us as a family, eating most of what she was given.  Now who knows where her mood will take her, there are some meals where she literally will take one bite.

So what’s the game plan?  We are sticking by our guns and still starting with the same foods that the rest of the family is eating at the meal. On average, she is initially refusing the meal about 90% of the time.  At that point one of two things will happen (after sufficient time has passed for her to debate about it and for us to at least eat something).  We will A. bribe her with small pieces of a coveted snack (currently pretzels) for taking bites of her dinner.  Or B. offer her other nutrient-dense,  easily prepared foods (cheese, PB & J, fruit, etc.).  Now you may not agree with these tactics, but in our house they are not permanent and our goal is to get her to eat the dinner or something substantial.  Dinner is really the picky time around here for both the Babe and AJ, mainly because it is the one meal where they do not get to choose the main course.  It is the meal where we push them to try new foods and new ways to prepare familiar foods.  At breakfast and lunch, they are given several options for what they would like to eat, so those meals are usually met with minimal resistance.  Just as we have done before, we are going to stick with it, try not to get frustrated and just keep moving along until this phase is over.  We have to remember the big picture, that as long as she is healthy, growing sufficiently and happy it really won’t matter that for a month or so she had to eat a piece of pretzel between every few bites to motivate her.  This too shall pass.

Battle Hymn of the Picky Eater

How many of you have been there? You prepare this nice meal, absolutely positive it is kid friendly, only to have it immediately rejected by your toddler within seconds of putting it on their plate. This has been my kids’ MO since they both were around 12 months old.
Initially, my son AJ’s stand was against any food that was once living and walked, swam or flew around the earth. I know this is not an issue for all, but he was on the smaller side and I was still concerned with his protein intake as well as other vitamin and minerals. That boy could have consisted on yogurt, bread and fruit alone. The Babe on the other hand, she definitely has a more diverse palate. She is intrigued by a wide variety of flavors and foods. You can generally count on her to at least take that first bite to try the new food. But that is where it ends, food seems to be for tasting purposes only. (Really, I should be thankful for this, tasting is half the battle). In the Babe’s case, I suspect teething is the culprit for her lack of appetite. Her pickiness is definitely heightened when there are ANY teeth breaking through. There are no favorites, no go-to foods that she will always eat. Dining is totally at her whim and often times she just has zero interest. My two children, textbook examples of the common eating behavior termed “food jags”. AJ demonstrates the classic desire to eat the same foods time and time again, while the Babe often refuses to eat at all, shoving aside foods that she has devoured in the past.
So there it is. Picky eating has been, by far, my one of my greatest challenges as a parent. Mostly because it drives me INSANE. There is all that wasted time, effort and food, but I continue to work at it. I am proud to report that after many years of relentlessly exposing AJ to new things and repeatedly trying them, at five years of age he now eats and enjoys foods from ALL the food groups. He still has picky tendencies but both he and the Babe’s diet and palate are continuing to expand.

Here are some tips for dealing with the picky eater in your life:
1. Stay calm.
2. Make sure they are hungry at mealtimes. (No snacking or giving filling beverages at
least 60-90 minutes before a meal).
3. Offer the new foods or foods you most want them to eat first.
4. Have minimal distractions.
5. Make it appealing (for a kid). Use fun shapes, colors, plates or silverware.
6. Eat together as a family, be a good role model.
7. Offer a variety of foods.
8. Don’t be a short-order cook. (This is especially true for older kids. With your
food-refusing toddler, I personally believe there is some grey area on this one).
9. Let them make decisions when possible. i.e. milk or water, peas or carrots, the Elmo or
Mickey Mouse plate
10. Try, try again. On average it takes 8-10 times for a child to grow accustomed to a
new food. It is not unheard of for it to take 20 plus time for this to occur. (See tip
number one).